Dickens map of Portsmouth

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Poverty

Women

Crime

Enterainment

Education

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Dickens's Birthplace

Dickens's birthplace

On the 7th February, 1812 Dickens was born at 13 Mile End Terrace.

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Highland Road Cemetery

Highland Road Cemetary

Ellen Ternan, reputedly Dickens's mistress, is buried here.

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Royal Portsmouth Hospital

Royal Portsmouth Hospital

This hospital had a 'Lock Ward' for the treatment of prostitutes under the regulations governed by the Contagious Diseases Acts 1863 - 1886.

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St Mary's Church

St Mary's Church

Dickens was baptised on 4th March in St Marys Church in 1812 by his parents, John and Elizabeth. His father was a clerk in the Navy pay office.

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Hawke Street

Hawke Street

Hawke Street was Dickens's second home in the deprived area of Portsea. The picture above shows the nearby Blossom Alley.

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Wish Street

Wish Street

Wish Street was Dickens's third home. The picture above shows the shops in nearby Elm Grove.

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Portsmouth Theatre

Portsmouth Theatre

The picture above shows The High Street looking north torwards Portsmouth Theatre and a poster for the Theatre Royal in Commercial Road.

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The Hard

The Hard

The Hard is the waterfront that the area of Portsea leads down to.

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Queen Street

Queen Street

Queen Street is the main road from The Dockyard which runs through Portsea. In this area, crime, poverty and prostitution were commonplace. The picture inset was created around the time Dickens was born.

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St Georges Square

St Georges Square

St Georges Hall was the last place that Dickens read on stage in Portsmouth.

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Southsea Common and the sea front

Penny Street

Clarence Pier, a centre of entertainment on the seafront, was opened during the Victorian era.

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Penny Street

Penny Street

The Borough gaol in Penny Street opened in 1808. The picture above shows the exercise yard at Newgate.

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Anchor Gate

Anchor Gate

The convict prison was built in 1852, near Anchor Gate.

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The Dockyard

Portsmouth Dockyard

Portsmouth was, and still is, home to the Royal Navy. The picture above shows looking across to The Dockyard from The Hard. Dickens's father was a clerk in the Navy pay office.

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Warblington Street

Warblington Street

Portsmouth Parish Workhouse.

 

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London Road

London Road - Workhouse

Portsea Workhouse. The picture above is St Marylebone workhouse in London.

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Portsea Union Workhouse

Portsea Union Workhouse

Portsea Union Workhouse in St Marys Road opened in 1846.

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Naval Academy

Eastern Parade

Many of the academies were situated in the more affluent Southsea and were designed to prepare boys for the navy, army or civil service. Aged 13, Charles Dickens’s son, Sydney, attended Eastman’s Naval Academy in Eastern Parade.

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King Street

King Street

For many children who could not attend day school, Sunday school was their only exposure to education. The picture above shows John Griffin, the first minister of the King Street Chapel.

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Orange Street school

Orange Street

Schooling for the children of the poor and working classes largely depended on churches, chapels and charitable organisations.

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Kent Street

Kent Street

Portsmouth Beneficial Society School (inset picture) in Kent Street. The picture above shows College Street leading through to Kent Street.

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John Pounds' workshop

St Mary's Street

The first Ragged School was founded by John Pounds (1766-1839) who is credited with initiating the Ragged School movement. Crippled as an apprentice in the dockyard, John Pounds became a cobbler in St. Mary's Street where he also taught poor children to read and write.

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Ordnance Row

Ordnance Row

In Portsmouth the first official Ragged School for about 140 children of the destitute poor originated in 1849 in Ordnance Row. The picture above shows nearby Britain Street and Ordnance Row is inset.

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Richmond Place

In Portsmouth the first official Ragged School moved from Ordnance Row to Richmond Place in 1855.

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Lion Terrace

Lion Terrace

The Portsmouth Seamen and Marines' Orphan Schools were established in 1834.

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Spring Street

Spring Street

In 1831, a charitable penitentiary was set up in Spring Street for prostitutes.

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The Camber Docks

Camber Docks

The Camber Docks are Portsmouth's oldest commercial port. The picture above is looking north-west across the harbour. It is around a 10 minute walk from Dickens's third home in Wish Street.

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Guildhall Square

Guildhall Square

A statue of Charles Dickens will be built here in July 2012.

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Devils Acre - Portsea

Portsea

The second house Dickens lived in was in Portsea, an area of tightly packed and poor quality housing in which prostitution, crime and poverty were common place. The harbour is to the left of the picture above and the barracks are in the top-right. The inset etching, 'Sailors Carousing' by George Cruikshank, shows inside a Portsea tavern.

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The Point

The Point

The Point area has contained numerous pubs and brothels for hundreds of years. (The latter have been removed in more recent years.) The picture above was painted just before Dickens was born.

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